CFA - F1
Home    Race    Driver by Season    Historical    Circuits    Tyres    Comments    Blog
F1 Regulations    F1 Glossary    Events    Biorhythms drivers
Calendar   FIA Official Page


FORMULA 1 GLOSSARY

uk flag Formula 1 Glossary

• 107% rule / During the first phase of qualifying, any driver who fails to set a lap within 107 percent of the fastest Q1 time will not be allowed to start the race. However, in exceptional circumstances, which could include a driver setting a suitable time during practice, the stewards may permit the car to start.

• Aerodynamics / The study of airflow over and around an object and an intrinsic part of Formula One car design.

• Apex / The middle point of the inside line around a corner at which drivers aim their cars.

• Appeal / An action that a team takes on its drivers' behalf if it feels that they have been unfairly penalised by the race officials.

• Ballast / Weights fixed around the car to maximise its balance and bring it up to the minimum weight limit.

• Bargeboard / The piece of bodywork mounted vertically between the front wheels and the start of the sidepods to help smooth the airflow around the sides of the car.

• Blistering / The consequence of a tyre, or part of a tyre, overheating. Excess heat can cause rubber to soften and break away in chunks from the body of the tyre. Blistering can be caused by the selection of an inappropriate tyre compound (for example, one that is too soft for circuit conditions), too high tyre pressure, or an improperly set up car.

• Bodywork / The carbon fibre sections fitted into the monocoque before the cars leave the pits, such as the engine cover, the cockpit top and the nosecone.

• Bottoming / When a car's chassis hits the track surface as it runs through a sharp compression and reaches the bottom of its suspension travel.

• Brake balance / A switch in the cockpit to alter the split of the car's braking power between the front and the rear wheels according to a driver's wishes.

• Chassis / The main part of a racing car to which the engine and suspension are attached is called the chassis.

• Chicane / A tight sequence of corners in alternate directions. Usually inserted into a circuit to slow the cars, often just before what had been a high-speed corner.

• Clean air / Air that isn't turbulent, and thus offers optimum aerodynamic conditions, as experienced by a car at the head of the field.

• Cockpit / The section of the chassis in which the driver sits.

• Compound / Tread compound is the part of any tyre in contact with the road and therefore one of the major factors in deciding tyre performance. The ideal compound is one with maximum grip but which still maintains durability and heat resistance. A typical Formula One race compound will have more than ten ingredients such as rubbers, polymers, sulphur, carbon black, oil and other curatives. Each of these includes a vast number of derivatives any of which can be used to a greater or lesser degree. Very small changes to the mix can change compound performance.

• Diffuser / The rear section of the car's floor or undertray where the air flowing under the car exits. The design of the diffuser is crucial as it controls the speed at which the air exits. The faster its exit, the lower the air pressure beneath the car, and hence the more downforce the car generates.

• Downforce / The aerodynamic force that is applied in a downwards direction as a car travels forwards. This is harnessed to improve a car's traction and its handling through corners.

• Drag / The aerodynamic resistance experienced as a car travels forwards.

• DRS / Also known as adjustable rear wings, DRS (Drag Reduction System) rear wings allow the driver to adjust the wing between two pre-determined settings from the cockpit. The system's availability is electronically governed - it can be used at any time in practice and qualifying (unless a driver is on wet-weather tyres), but during the race can only be activated when a driver is less than one second behind another car at pre-determined points on the track. The system is then deactivated once the driver brakes. In combination with KERS, it is designed to boost overtaking. Also like KERS, it isn't compulsory.

• Drive-through penalty / One of two penalties that can be handed out at the discretion of the Stewards whilst the race is still running. Drivers must enter the pit lane, drive through it complying with the speed limit, and re-join the race without stopping.

• Flat spot / The term given to the area of a tyre that is worn heavily on one spot after a moment of extreme braking or in the course of a spin. This ruins its handling, often causing severe vibration, and may force a driver to pit for a replacement set of tyres.

• Formation lap / The lap before the start of the race when the cars are driven round from the grid to form up on the grid again for the start of the race. Sometimes referred to as the warm-up lap or parade lap.

• G-force / A physical force equivalent to one unit of gravity that is multiplied during rapid changes of direction or velocity. Drivers experience severe G-forces as they corner, accelerate and brake.

• Graining / When a car slides, it can cause little bits or rubber ('grains') to break away from the tyre's grooves. These then stick to the tread of the tyre, effectively separating the tyre from the track surface very slightly. For the driver, the effect is like driving on ball bearings. Careful driving can clear the graining within a few laps, but will obviously have an effect on the driver's pace. Driving style, track conditions, car set-up, fuel load and the tyre itself all play a role in graining. In essence, the more the tyre moves about on the track surface (ie slides), the more likely graining is.

• Gravel trap / A bed of gravel on the outside of corners designed with the aim of bringing cars that fall off the circuit to a halt.

• Diffuser / The rear section of the car's floor or undertray where the air flowing under the car exits. The design of the diffuser is crucial as it controls the speed at which the air exits. The faster its exit, the lower the air pressure beneath the car, and hence the more downforce the car generates.

• Downforce / The aerodynamic force that is applied in a downwards direction as a car travels forwards. This is harnessed to improve a car's traction and its handling through corners.

• Drag / The aerodynamic resistance experienced as a car travels forwards.

• DRS / Also known as adjustable rear wings, DRS (Drag Reduction System) rear wings allow the driver to adjust the wing between two pre-determined settings from the cockpit. The system's availability is electronically governed - it can be used at any time in practice and qualifying (unless a driver is on wet-weather tyres), but during the race can only be activated when a driver is less than one second behind another car at pre-determined points on the track. The system is then deactivated once the driver brakes. In combination with KERS, it is designed to boost overtaking. Also like KERS, it isn't compulsory.

• Drive-through penalty / One of two penalties that can be handed out at the discretion of the Stewards whilst the race is still running. Drivers must enter the pit lane, drive through it complying with the speed limit, and re-join the race without stopping.

• Flat spot / The term given to the area of a tyre that is worn heavily on one spot after a moment of extreme braking or in the course of a spin. This ruins its handling, often causing severe vibration, and may force a driver to pit for a replacement set of tyres.

• Formation lap / The lap before the start of the race when the cars are driven round from the grid to form up on the grid again for the start of the race. Sometimes referred to as the warm-up lap or parade lap.

• G-force / A physical force equivalent to one unit of gravity that is multiplied during rapid changes of direction or velocity. Drivers experience severe G-forces as they corner, accelerate and brake.

• Graining / When a car slides, it can cause little bits or rubber ('grains') to break away from the tyre's grooves. These then stick to the tread of the tyre, effectively separating the tyre from the track surface very slightly. For the driver, the effect is like driving on ball bearings. Careful driving can clear the graining within a few laps, but will obviously have an effect on the driver's pace. Driving style, track conditions, car set-up, fuel load and the tyre itself all play a role in graining. In essence, the more the tyre moves about on the track surface (ie slides), the more likely graining is.

• Gravel trap / A bed of gravel on the outside of corners designed with the aim of bringing cars that fall off the circuit to a halt.

• Grip / The amount of traction a car has at any given point, affecting how easy it is for the driver to keep control through corners.

• Installation lap / A lap done on arrival at a circuit, testing functions such as throttle, brakes and steering before heading back to the pits without crossing the finish line.

• Jump start / When a driver moves off his grid position before the five red lights have been switched off to signal the start. Sensors detect premature movement and a jump start earns a driver a penalty.

• KERS / Kinetic Energy Recovery Systems, or KERS, are legal from 2009 onwards. KERS recover waste kinetic energy from the car during braking, store that energy and then make it available to propel the car. The driver has access to the additional power for limited periods per lap, via a 'boost button' on the steering wheel.

• Left-foot braking / A style of braking made popular in the 1990s following the arrival of hand clutches so that drivers could keep their right foot on the throttle and dedicate their left to braking.

• Lollipop / The sign on a stick held in front of the car during a pit stop to inform the driver to apply the brakes and then to engage first gear prior to the car being lowered from its jacks.

• Marshal / A course official who oversees the safe running of the race. Marshals have several roles to fill, including observing the spectators to ensure they do not endanger themselves or the competitors, acting as fire wardens, helping to remove stranded cars/drivers from the track and using waving flags to signal the condition of the track to drivers.

• Monocoque / The single-piece tub in which the cockpit is located, with the engine fixed behind it and the front suspension on either side at the front.

• Oversteer / When a car's rear end doesn't want to go around a corner and tries to overtake the front end as the driver turns in towards the apex. This often requires opposite-lock to correct, whereby the driver turns the front wheels into the skid.

• Paddles / Levers on either side of the back of a steering wheel with which a driver changes up and down the gearbox.

• Paddock / An enclosed area behind the pits in which the teams keep their transporters and motor homes. There is no admission to the public.

• Parc ferme / A fenced-off area into which cars are driven after qualifying and the race, where no team members are allowed to touch them except under the strict supervision of race stewards.

• Pit board / A board held out on the pit wall to inform a driver of his race position, the time interval to the car ahead or the one behind, plus the number of laps of the race remaining.

• Pit wall / Where the team owner, managers and engineers spend the race, usually under an awning to keep sun and rain off their monitors.

• Pits / An area of track separated from the start/finish straight by a wall, where the cars are brought for new tyres and fuel during the race, or for set-up changes in practice, each stopping at their respective pit garages.

• Plank / A hard wooden strip (also known as a skid block) that is fitted front-to-back down the middle of the underside of all cars to check that they are not being run too close to the track surface, something that is apparent if the wood is excessively worn.

• Pole position / The first place on the starting grid, as awarded to the driver who recorded the fastest lap time in qualifying.

• Practice / The periods on Friday and on Saturday morning at a Grand Prix meeting when the drivers are out on the track working on the set-up of their cars in preparation for qualifying and the race.

• Protest / An action lodged by a team when it considers that another team or competitor has transgressed the rules.

• Qualifying / The knock-out session on Saturday in which the drivers compete to set the best time they can in order to determine the starting grid for the race.

• Reconnaissance lap / A lap completed when drivers leave the pits to assemble on the grid for the start. If a driver decides to do several, they must divert through the pit lane as the grid will be crowded with team personnel.

• Retirement / When a car has to drop out of the race because of an accident or mechanical failure.

• Ride height / The height between the track's surface and the floor of the car.

• Safety Car / The course vehicle that is called from the pits to run in front of the leading car in the race in the event of a problem that requires the cars to be slowed.

• Scrutineering / The technical checking of cars by the officials to ensure that none are outside the regulations.

• Sectors / For timing purposes the lap is split into three sections, each of which is roughly a third of the lap. These sections are officially known as Sector 1, Sector 2 and Sector 3.

• Shakedown / A brief test when a team is trying a different car part for the first time before going back out to drive at 100 percent to set a fast time.

• Sidepod / The part of the car that flanks the sides of the monocoque alongside the driver and runs back to the rear wing, housing the radiators.

• Slipstreaming / A driving tactic when a driver is able to catch the car ahead and duck in behind its rear wing to benefit from a reduction in drag over its body and hopefully be able to achieve a superior maximum speed to slingshot past before the next corner.

• Steward / One of three high-ranking officials at each Grand Prix appointed to make decisions.

• Stop-go penalty / A penalty given that involves the driver calling at his pit and stopping for 10 seconds - with no refuelling or tyre-changing allowed.

• Tear-off strips / See-through plastic strips that drivers fit to their helmet's visor before the start of the race and then remove as they become dirty.

• Telemetry / A system that beams data related to the engine and chassis to computers in the pit garage so that engineers can monitor that car's behaviour.

• Torque / Literally, the turning or twisting force of an engine, torque is generally used as a measure of an engine's flexibility. An engine may be very powerful, but if it has little torque then that power may only be available over a limited rev range, making it of limited use to the driver. An engine with more torque - even if it has less power - may actually prove quicker on many tracks, as the power is available over a far wider rev range and hence more accessible. Good torque is particularly vital on circuits with a number of mid- to slow-speed turns, where acceleration out of the corners is essential to a good lap time.

• Traction / The degree to which a car is able to transfer its power onto the track surface for forward progress.

• Traction control / A computerised system that detects if either of a car's driven (rear) wheels is losing traction - ie spinning - and transfers more drive to the wheel with more traction, thus using its more power efficiently. Outlawed from the 2008 season onwards.

• Turbulence / The result of the disruption of airflow caused by an interruption to its passage, such as when it hits a rear wing and its horizontal flow is spoiled.

• Tyre compound / The type of rubber mix used in the construction of a tyre, ranging from soft through medium to hard, with each offering a different performance and wear characteristic.

• Tyre warmer / An electric blanket that is wrapped around the tyres before they are fitted to the car so that they will start closer to their optimum operating temperature.

• Understeer / Where the front end of the car doesn't want to turn into a corner and slides wide as the driver tries to turn in towards the apex.

• Undertray / A separate floor to the car that is bolted onto the underside of the monocoque.

es flag Glosario Formula 1

• Abandono / Circunstancia que se produce cuando un monoplaza se retira de la carrera debido a un accidente o a un fallo mecánico.

• Aerodinámica / Estudio del flujo de aire sobre y alrededor de un objeto. Parte intrínseca del diseño de un monoplaza de Fórmula 1.

• Apelación / Acción que toma un equipo en nombre de sus pilotos si siente injustamente penalizado por los oficiales de carrera.

• Apex / Punto medio de la trazada de una curva hacia la que los pilotos dirigen sus autos.

• Bargeboard - "Laminadores" / Pieza de carrocería montada verticalmente entre las ruedas delanteras al inicio de los pontones para ayudar a suavizar el flujo de aire en torno a los laterales de un monoplaza.

• Blistering / Formación de ampollas como consecuencia del sobrecalentamiento de un neumático, o de una parte de él. El exceso de calor puede ablandar el caucho y romper en pedazos el cuerpo del neumático. La formación de ampollas puede ser también causada por la selección de neumático con un compuesto inapropiado (por ejemplo, uno que demasiado blando para las condiciones del circuito), por una presión de los neumáticos demasiado alta, o por una configuración incorrecta de un monoplaza.

• Bottoming - "Tocando fondo" / Cuando el chasis de un monoplaza golpea la superficie de la pista al realizarse sobre él una fuerte presión y llegar la suspensión a la parte más baja de su recorrido.

• Carrocería / Las secciones de fibra de carbono montadas sobre el monocasco antes de que un monoplaza salga de su taller, tales como la cubierta del motor, la parte superior del puesto de pilotaje y el morro.

• Chasis / Es la parte principal de un monoplaza sobre la que se monta el motor, los elementos mecánicos y las suspensiones.

• Chicane / Secuencia apretada de curvas en direcciones alternas. Por lo general, se intercala en un circuito para reducir la velocidad de los coches, a menudo donde antes había existido una curva de alta velocidad.

• Clean air - "Aire libre de turbulencia" / Aire que no es turbulento, y por lo tanto ofrece óptimas condiciones aerodinámicas, como las experimentadas por un coche en la cabeza de un grupo.

• Cockpit - "Cabina" / Parte del chasis en la que se sienta el piloto.

• Compuesto / Compuesto de caucho es la parte de cualquier neumático en contacto con la pista y por lo tanto uno de los principales factores en el factor de rendimiento de los neumáticos. El compuesto ideal sería uno con agarre máximo pero que mantuviera la durabilidad y la resistencia al calor. Un compuesto típico en las carreras de F1 tendrá más de diez componentes tales como cauchos, polímeros, azufre, carbón negro, petróleo y otros agentes de curtido. Cada uno de estos incluye a su vez un gran número de derivados de cualquiera de los cuales se pueden utilizar en mayor o menor medida. Cambios muy pequeños en la mezcla puede modificar sustancialmente el rendimiento del compuesto.

• Difusor / Parte trasera del fondo del monoplaza o placa inferior por la que el aire fluye hasta salir de él. Su diseño es fundamental ya que controla la velocidad a la que el aire sale. Cuanto más rápida es su salida, menor es la presión de aire bajo el monoplaza incrementando con ello su carga aerodinámica.

• Downforce / Fuerza aerodinámica aplicada en una dirección descendente cuando un monoplaza se encuentra circulando. Esta fuerza se aprovecha para mejorar su tracción y su manejo en curvas.

• Drag - "Arrastre" / Resistencia aerodinámica experimentada cuando un monoplaza avanza hacia delante.

• DRS (Drag Reduction System) / Sistema que permite al piloto desde su cockpit - cabina ajustar el ala de su alerón trasero entre dos ajustes predeterminados. Su disponibilidad se regula electrónicamente, puede ser utilizado en cualquier momento en entrenamientos y calificaciones (salvo cuando el piloto utiliza neumáticos de lluvia), pero durante la carrera sólo se puede activar en lugares predeterminados en la pista cuando un piloto se encuentra a menos de un segundo por detrás de otro vehículo. El sistema se desactiva automáticamente una vez que el piloto frena. En combinación con el sistema KERS, está diseñado para favorecer los adelantamientos. Al igual que el KERS, no es obligatorio.

• Drive-through penalty / Es una de las dos penalizaciones que puede aplicarse a discreción de los comisarios cuando aún se está disputado la carrera. El piloto sancionado ha de pasar por la línea de talleres, respetando el límite de velocidad establecido, para después reincorporarse a la carrera sin detenerse.

• Equilibrio de frenada / Interruptor en el puesto de pilotaje para modificar el balance de frenado entre el tren delantero y el trasero de un monoplaza de acuerdo a los deseos del piloto.

• Flat spot - "Plano" / Término aplicado a una sección del neumático que se ha aplanado o desgastado excesivamente después de una frenada brusca o de un trompo. Esta circunstancia arruina su utilización, a menudo causando severas vibraciones, incluso obligando a un piloto a entrar en su taller para reemplazar su juego completo de neumáticos.

• Fuerza G / Fuerza física equivalente a una unidad de gravedad que se multiplica durante los cambios bruscos de dirección o de velocidad. Los pilotos experimentan elevada fuerza G cuando negocian curvas, aceleran o frenan.

• Graining - " granulado" / Cuando un monoplaza patina, pueden regenerarse pedacitos o bolitas de caucho ("granos") que dañan el dibujo de los neumáticos. Entonces, estos se pegan a la banda de rodadura del neumático, separando muy ligeramente el neumático de la superficie de la pista. Para el piloto, ese efecto es como conducir sobre cojinetes de bolas. Una cuidadosa conducción puede eliminar el granulado en un par de vueltas, pero eso obviamente siempre tiene un efecto negativo en el ritmo del piloto. Estilos de pilotaje, condiciones de pista, reglajes del monoplaza, carga de combustible y el propio neumático, tienen una influencia directa en el "graining". En resumen, cuanto más se mueve el neumático sobre la superficie de la pista (es decir, patina), la posibilidad de "graining" es más probable.

• Gravel trap - "trampa de grava" / Lecho de grava en el exterior de las curvas diseñado con el objetivo de detener a los monoplazas que se salen a alta velocidad del circuito.

• Grip - "agarre" / Cantidad de tracción o agarre que un monoplaza tiene en un momento dado y que afecta a la facilidad con la que el piloto mantiene su control en curvas.

• Jump start - "saltarse la salida" / Cuando un piloto se mueve fuera de su posición en la parrilla antes de que las cinco luces rojas se hayan apagado para indicar el inicio de carrera. Si los sensores detectan algún movimiento previo al lanzamiento de carrera, el piloto es penalizado.

• KERS - Kinetic Energy Recovery Systems / Los sistemas de recuperación de energía cinética, legales a partir de 2009, ayudan a recuperar desde el monoplaza la energía cinética residual al frenar, almacenarla y ponerla a disposición del propulsor del propio monoplaza. El piloto tiene acceso a esa energía adicional durante períodos limitados por vuelta, a través de un "botón de impulso" en el volante.

• Lastre / Pesos fijos colocados en un monoplaza para maximizar su equilibrio y permitirle obtener su límite de peso mínimo.

• Left-foot braking - "frenado con el pie izquierdo" / Estilo de frenado que se hizo popular en la década de los 90 con la llegada de las paletas de cambio en el volante. Los pilotos pueden mantener el pie derecho sobre el acelerador y utilizan el izquierdo para frenar.

• Lollipop - "piruleta" / Señal sostenida en una barra por encima de la parte delantera del monoplaza durante una parada en talleres para informar al piloto de mantener pisado el freno y luego de poner la primera velocidad antes de que el vehículo sea bajado de sus gatos.

• Marshal - "comisario" / Oficial de carrera que supervisa la seguridad en carrera. Los comisarios tienen asignadas varias funciones, entre las que se incluyen: la vigilancia de los espectadores para asegurar que no se pongan en peligro a sí mismos o a los competidores; actuar como bomberos, ayudar a retirar los monoplazas parados o a los pilotos de la pista y la utilización de banderas para señalar el estado de la pista a los pilotos.

• Monocasco / Estructura de una sola pieza en la que se encuentra la cabina ("cockpit"), con el motor fijado tras ella y las suspensiones delanteras de ambos lados.

• Paddles - "paletas" / Palancas situadas a cada lado de la parte posterior del volante de dirección con las que el piloto realiza los cambios de marcha.

• Paddock / Espacio cerrado en la parte posterior de los talleres en la que los distintos equipos estacionan sus vehículos de transporte y autocaravanas. No es una zona abierta al público.

• Parc ferme - "parque cerrado" / Área cercada a la que los monoplazas son conducidos después de la calificación o de la carrera, en la que los miembros del equipo no pueden tocarlos, excepto bajo la estricta autorización y supervisión de los comisarios de la carrera.

• Pit board / Tablero que se muestra a un piloto desde el muro de talleres para comunicarle información tal como su posición en carrera, la diferencia de tiempo respecto al vehículo que le precede o que le sigue y el número de vueltas que le restan en carrera.

• Pit wall - "muro de pit" / Espacio en el que se ubica el propietario del equipo, gerentes e ingenieros para observar la carrera, generalmente bajo un toldo protegidos del sol o de la lluvia, tanto ellos como sus monitores de control y seguimiento de la prueba.

• Pits / Área de la pista separada de la zona de salida / llegada solamente por una pared, donde los monoplazas son conducidos para los cambios de neumáticos durante la carrera y cargar de combustible o realización de reglajes en los entrenamientos y calificaciones. Cada monoplaza cuenta con un puesto en su respectivo taller.

• Plank - "tablón" / Tira de madera rígida (también conocido como "calzo") colocada en el centro de la parte inferior de todos los monoplazas, de adelante hacia atrás, para comprobar que no esté circulando demasiado cerca de la superficie de la pista, algo que sería evidente si la madera presentase un desgaste excesivo.

• Pole position / Primer lugar en la parrilla de salida que se otorga al piloto que registra el mejor tiempo en las tandas de calificación.

• Practice - "entrenamiento" / Períodos del viernes y el sábado por la mañana previos a un Gran Premio en los que los pilotos están en pista trabajando en la puesta a punto de sus monoplazas ajustándolos para calificaciones y carrera.

• Protesta / Reclamación presentada por un equipo cuando considera que otro equipo u otro competidor ha transgredido las reglas.

• Qualifying - "calificaciones" / Sesiones eliminatorias del sábado en las que los pilotos compiten para establecer el mejor tiempo posible a fin de determinar su posición en la parrilla de salida para la carrera.

• Regla del 107% / A todo piloto que durante la primera tanda de clasificaciones ("Q1") no pueda establecer un tiempo inferior al 107 por ciento del mejor tiempo de clasificación ("pole position") no se le permitirá participar en carrera. Sin embargo, en circunstancias excepcionales, que incluso podrían incluir la de algún piloto que no haya marcado ningún tiempo en calificación, los comisarios podrán permitirle participar en carrera.

• Ride height / Altura entre la superficie de la pista y el fondo del monoplaza.

• Safety car - "coche de seguridad" / Vehículo oficial que se encuentra en talleres durante toda la carrera, dispuesto a salir a pista para situarse delante del líder de la prueba en el caso de que algún problema requiera puntualmente, bajo el criterio del director de carrera, la ralentización de los monoplazas.

• Scrutinnering - "verificaciones" / Control técnico de los monoplazas por parte de los comisarios de carrera para asegurarse de que no hay ninguno fuera de las normas.

• Sectores / La tres secciones en las que se divide una vuelta a efectos de cálculo de tiempos, cada una de las cuales es aproximadamente un tercio de ella. Estas secciones son oficialmente conocidas como Sector 1, Sector 2 y Sector 3.

• Shakedown / Comprobación que realiza un equipo tras la incorporación de una pieza nueva en su monoplaza probando su respuesta antes de forzarla al cien por cien con el objetivo de establecer un tiempo rápido.

• Sidepod - "pontón lateral" / Parte del vehículo que flanquea ambos lados del monocasco junto al piloto y pasa bajo el alerón trasero, albergando los radiadores.

• Sobrevirage - "oversteer" / Cuando al girar el piloto hacia el interior del "apex" de una curva la parte trasera de un monoplaza parece no querer entrar en ella y trata de superar a la parte delantera. Para corregirlo, a menudo, se requiere un "contravolanteo": el piloto gira las ruedas delanteras hacia la dirección del deslizamiento del monoplaza.

• Slipstreaming - "refubo" / Táctica de conducción en la que un piloto se sitúa muy cerca del alerón trasero del auto que le precede para beneficiarse de una reducción en el rozamiento de aire sobre su monoplaza, tratando de alcanzar una velocidad máxima superior a él que le permita lanzarse y poder superarle antes de la siguiente curva.

• Stewart / Uno de los tres oficiales de más alto rango en cada gran premio nombrado para adoptar decisiones.

• Stop-go penalty / Penalización que implica que un piloto tenga que detenerse ante el "pit" de su taller durante 10 segundos antes de poder volverse a incorporar a la carrera. En esta maniobra nos están permitidos los cambios de neumáticos.

• Tear-off strips - "tiras de arrancar" / Tiras de plástico se que ajustan a la visera del casco de un piloto antes del comienzo de la carrera para ver a través de ellas y que pueden irse arrancando a medida que se van ensuciando.

• Telemetría / Sistema que transmite todos los datos relacionados con el motor y el chasis de un monoplaza al "pit wall" del equipo de tal manera que los ingenieros puedan supervisar su comportamiento.

• Torque / Literalmente, fuerza de giro o torsión de un motor, el par se utiliza generalmente como medida de la flexibilidad de un motor. Un motor puede ser muy potente, pero si tiene un par bajo su potencia sólo está disponible en un limitado rango de revoluciones, por lo que ésta encuentra muy limitada para el piloto. Un motor con más par, incluso si tiene menos potencia, puede ser en realidad más rápido en muchas pistas, ya que su potencia está disponible en una gama mucho más amplia de revoluciones y por lo tanto más elástico. Un buen par es especialmente vital en circuitos con trazado de velocidad media - baja, en los que la aceleración a la salida de curvas es esencial para la obtención de un buen tiempo en vuelta.

• Traction - "tracción" / Grado en que un monoplaza es capaz de transferir su energía a la superficie de la pista para avanzar.

• Traction control - "control de tracción" / Sistema computarizado que detecta si alguna de las ruedas traseras del monoplaza pierde tracción (es decir "spinning") y automáticamente transfiere mayor impulso a la rueda con más tracción, utilizando así su potenciar de una manera más eficiente. Su utilización fue prohibida partir del 2008.

• Turbulencia / Resultado de la ruptura del flujo de aire causado por una interrupción de su paso, como por ejemplo cuando se corta con un alerón trasero y se pierde su flujo horizontal.

• Tyre compound - "tipo de compuesto" / Tipo de mezcla de caucho utilizada en la construcción de un neumático que va desde blando pasando por medio hasta llegar a duro, cada uno de ellos con un rendimiento diferente y un desgaste característico.

• Tyre warmer - "calentadores" / Manta eléctrica con la que se envuelve un neumático antes de ser montado en el monoplaza, de tal forma que se encuentre cerca de su temperatura óptima de funcionamiento.

• Vuelta de formación / Vuelta previa al inicio de carrera cuando los monoplazas arrancan desde la parrilla de salida y se dirigen de nuevo a formar en ella antes de comenzar la carrera. Es también conocida como vuelta de calentamiento o "warm-up".

• Vuelta de instalación / Vuelta realizada al llegar al circuito, probando funciones tales como acelerador, frenos y dirección antes de regresar a talleres sin cruzar la línea de meta.

• Vuelta de reconocimiento / Vuelta completa en la que los pilotos abandonan sus talleres para formar la parrilla de salida. Si el piloto decide hacer varias, tiene que desviarse por la calle de talleres ya que en la parrilla se encuentra el personal de los equipos.

• Understeer - "subviraje" / Cuando la parte delantera del monoplaza no quiere girar en una curva y se desliza cuando el piloto intenta girar hacia el "apex".

• Undertray - "bandeja inferior" / Bandeja / placa que se atornilla al monocasco en la parte inferior del monoplaza.



uk flag Formula 1 Regulations

uk flag Formula 1 Glossary

es flag Normativa Formula 1

es flag Glosario Formula 1


Login   Register   Forecasts   GP Results   User Results   Standings   CFA Regulations   Simulator



CFA Formula 1

www.manbos.com
 For any issue related to the website you can send a message to webmaster
Copyright 2001-2017 MANBOS